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VOA Broadcasting in Somali

VOA reaches Somalia and neighboring countries on AM, FM, shortwave radio, the Internet, and through mobile devices. A team of Somali broadcasters based in Washington, D.C., along with freelance reporters in Somalia and elsewhere in Africa and the world provides news to a country mired in anarchy since 1991 that is now trying to establish a democratic government.

Quick Facts

Established: February 2007

Target area: Somalia and the rest of the Horn region

Weekly Audience: 51% in Mogadishu, and a significant number of the one to two million Somali Diaspora

Radio Programming: 4 hours daily, seven days per week (one hour is repeated daily)

TV Programming: 15 minutes per week

Programs and additional features available at:
www.somalivoa.com

Facebook:

VOA Somali1

Twitter:

@voa_somali

Podcasts:

3 podcasts available on My Yahoo, iTunes, and voanews.com

Printable Version

Programs and Features

VOA Somali broadcasts four radio programs daily: a 30-minute breakfast show from 0330-0400 UTC (6:30-7:00 am in Somalia); a 30-minute youth show from 10:30-11:00 UTC (1:30pm-2:pm in Somalia); a one-hour afternoon program from 1300-1400 UTC (4:00-5:00 pm in Somalia); and a one- hour evening program from 1600-1700 UTC (7:00-8:00 pm) that is repeated at 17:00 18 UTC (8:00 pm, Somalia time) for affiliates on a daily basis.

Programs air on AM, FM, shortwave radio and the Internet. News is also accessible on mobile devices. FM Somali stations that carry the program include Radio Mogadishu, Kulmiye Radio, also in Mogadishu, STAR FM in Kenya and parts of Somalia, SBC Radio and Radio Daljir in Puntland, Somalia. Radio Garowe in Somalia hosts a link to the program on its website. VOA Somali is broadcast via two 24-hour VOA FM transmitters - in Hargeisa, Somalia (Somaliland), and in Djibouti.

The radio programs focus in depth on a wide range of Somali affairs, including political and social issues, health topics, development, music and culture. Panel discussions, debates, interviews with newsmakers, and call-ins encourage Somalis – both leaders and the general audience – to express their opinions on topics of interest. People who drive the news, from the Somali President to insurgents, are interviewed. The service produces a 15-minute weekly TV show, Qubanaha (“Magazine”).

Somali broadcasts are also streamed on the service’s website, making them available to the Somali Diaspora of more than one million people worldwide. The service also provides three daily podcasts.

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